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Thursday, March 10, 2016
12:00pm - 2:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons- Room 602

The Arab uprisings of 2011 shook the societies and politics of the Middle East and North Africa. Join POMEPS for this panel that examines how these dramatic shifts have created both new openings and challenges for women in the region.

Panelists:
Vickie Langohr – College of the Holy Cross
Marwa Shalaby – Rice University
Hind Ahmed Zaki – University of Washington
Mona Tajali- Agnes Scott College
Moderated by:
Marc Lynch – George Washington University

Thursday, March 10, 2016
12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
1957 E. Street, NW
Lindner Familly Commons

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With Dr. Joseph Sassoon

Wednesday, March 9, 2016
12:00pm - 1:15pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons 

Dr. Joseph Sassoon will join MEPF to discuss his recent release, Anatomy of Authoritarianism in the Arab Republics. By examining the system of authoritarianism in eight Arab republics, Dr. Sassoon portrays life under these regimes and explores the mechanisms underpinning their resilience. How did the leadership in these countries create such enduring systems? What was the economic system that prolonged the regimes’ longevity, but simultaneously led to their collapse? Why did these seemingly stable regimes begin to falter? This book seeks to answer these questions by utilizing the Iraqi archives and memoirs of those who were embedded in these republics: political leaders, ministers, generals, security agency chiefs, party members, and business people. Joseph Sassoon is an Associate Professor at Georgetown University and holds the al-Sabah Chair in Politics and Political Economy of the Arab World. He is also a Senior Associate Member at St Antony’s College, Oxford. In 2013, his book Saddam Hussein’s Ba‘th Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime (Cambridge University Press, 2012) won the prestigious British-Kuwait Prize for the best book on the Middle East.

Lindner Family Commons, 1957 E Street, NW

March 9th, 2016

12:00pm-1:15pm

RSVP HERE

*A light lunch will be available*

*Limited copies of the book will be available for students*

*The Middle East Policy Forum is presented with the generous support of ExxonMobil.

With Professor Alex Henley

Friday, March 4, 2016
5:00pm - 8:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Room 505

Set in a remote village where the church and the mosque stand side by side, “Where Do We Go Now?” follows the antics of the town’s women to keep their blowhard men from starting a religious war. Women heartsick over sons, husbands and fathers lost to previous flare-ups unite to distract their men with clever ruses, from faking a miracle to hiring a troop of Ukrainian strippers.

Friday, March 4, 2016
5:00-7:00 pm
1957 E Street, NW
Room 505
RSVP

Thursday, March 3, 2016
3:30-5:00 pm

1957 E Street, NW
Room 505

Contemporary journalism is increasingly relying on new forms of media that bring the news consumer to the forefront -- but how has this affected reporting on one of the most volatile areas in the world: the Middle East? And how is it affecting who can and is doing the reporting? AJ+ producer Sana Saeed will explore these issues and more through the lens of her unorthodox career towards and within New Journalism.
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Sana Saeed is a producer with AJ+ and a writer who focuses on national security, foreign policy and media representations of Islam and the Middle East.

with Dr. Robert Vitalis
Thursday, February 18, 2016
12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
1957 E. Street, NW
Lindner Family Commons, 6th Floor

Racism and imperialism propelled the course of the United States in the world in the early twentieth century and in turn affected the way that international relations was taught and understood in the American academy. In White World Order, Black Power Politics, Robert Vitalis recovers the arguments, texts, and institution building of an extraordinary group of professors at Howard University, including Alain Locke, Ralph Bunche, Rayford Logan, Eric Williams, and Merze Tate, who was the first black female professor of political science in the country. Vitalis pairs the contributions of white and black scholars to reconstitute forgotten historical dialogues and show the critical role played by race in the formation of international relations.

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Robert Vitalis is Professor of Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of America's Kingdom: Mythmaking on the Saudi Oil Frontier and When Capitalists Collide: Business Conflict and the End of Empire in Egypt and coeditor of Counter-Narratives: History, Society and Politics in Saudi Arabia and Yemen.

The Middle East: Broken Nations, Splintered Coalitions, and Shattered Societies

 

Tuesday, February 16, 2016
6:30pm - 8:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
113

Ambassador Gnehm will examine the significant issues that underlay the Middle East's current state of disorder and turmoil, especially in Iraq and Syria. He will provide an assessment of where the region is heading and what major challenges will remain in the years to come.

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A conversation with Ellen McLarney

Monday, February 8, 2016
12:00pm - 2:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602

Ellen McLarney will join POMEPS to discuss her recent release, Soft Force: Women in Egypt’s Islamic Awakening (Princeton University Press 2015). Ellen McLarney is an assistant professor of Arabic literature and culture at Duke University.
* A light lunch will be available*
* Limited copies of the book will be available for students*

A Conversation with Sean L. Yom

Monday, February 1, 2016
12:00pm - 2:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602

Sean L. Yom will join POMEPS to discuss his recent release, From Resilience to Revolution: How Foreign Interventions Destabilize the Middle East (Columbia University Press 2015). Sean L. Yom is an assistant professor of political science at Temple University. His research focuses on the comparative politics of the Middle East, especially the dynamics and effects of authoritarianism, democracy, and U.S. foreign policy.

* A light lunch will be available*
* Limited copies of the book will be available for students*