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with Shaheen Pasha
Tuesday, March 7, 2017

3:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602

Shaheen Pasha is an Assistant Professor of Journalism at the University of Massachusetts - Amherst. She previously worked as the Middle East Regional Editor for The Brief, a legal magazine published by Thomson Reuters. Prior to launching the magazine, Pasha was the Islamic finance correspondent at Thomson Reuters, based in Dubai. She has been an assistant professor of journalism at The American University in Cairo, teaching print and online journalism for undergraduate and graduate students, and has worked at CNNMoney.com as a banking and legal reporter, covering the Supreme Court and the Enron trial. Pasha was also a reporter at Dow Jones Newswires, where she had a daily column in the Wall Street Journal and appeared as a regular correspondent on CNBC Asia, covering the ADR market.
She has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia Graduate School of Journalism and a bachelor's degree in speech communication from Pace University.
Pasha will join us at the Elliott School on March 7 to discuss the challenges for those in the journalism and media industries in covering the war in Syria and the ongoing conflict in Iraq. She will give some background on the conflict, bringing in a discussion of the difficulties journalists are facing on the ground, and ISIS' own media efforts in the form of their magazine, Dabiq. This event aims specifically to engage journalists and other media specialists, but is open to all.
Sponsored By:

The Institute for Middle East Studies and the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant Program.

With Ahmed Ragab
Thursday, March 2, 2017

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Room 505

Ahmed Ragab is the Richard T. Watson Assistant Professor of Science and Religion at Harvard Divinity School, affiliate assistant professor at the department of the history of science, and director of the Science, Religion and Culture program at Harvard Divinity School.
Ragab is a physician, a historian of science and medicine, and a scholar of science and religion. He received his MD from Cairo University School of Medicine in 2005. In 2010 he received his PhD in History and Philosophy of Science from L'École Pratique des Hautes Études in Paris. He was a postdoctoral fellow, then a lecturer of the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University. He joined Harvard Divinity School in July 2011 as the first Richard T. Watson Assistant Professor of Science and Religion at Harvard Divinity School. In 2012, Ragab inaugurated the Science, Religion and Culture program at Harvard Divinity School, which he continues to direct.
Ragab’s work spans various fields and disciplines. He studies the history of science and medicine, science and religion and the development of cultures of science and cultures of religion in the Middle East and the Islamic World. He also studies various questions related to science and religion in the US with a focus on US Muslim communities.
Sponsored By:

The Institute for Middle East Studies and the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant Program.

with Fahad Bishara
Wednesday, February 22, 2017

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Elliott School of International Affairs
Room 505

The study of the history of capitalism has experienced something of a renaissance over the past decade or so, and has reinvigorated the field of economic history in the American academy and beyond. The discussion thus far, however, has largely pivoted around the Atlantic experience; although global histories of capitalism have gestured towards the Islamic world, work on the latter is only just beginning to surface.
This talk explores the possibilities of a history of capitalism in the Islamic world through the prism of one of its most visible expressions: the bazaar. As the locus of a range of different commercial practices, the bazaar offers a useful platform for thinking about economic life in the Islamic world -- production, consumption, exchange, and finance. It is also the site through which the inhabitants of the Islamic world came to experience the changing tides of global commerce and politics: the wares of India and Africa, the textiles of Northern Europe, and most recently, the manufactures of China. And yet, as an object of scholarly analysis, the bazaar has largely been reduced to a set of interpersonal or patron-client relations, flattening what was in fact a vibrant site of exchange and transformation.
Rather than speak of the bazaar in the abstract, Professor Bishara will focus on a specific network of bazaars around the Indian Ocean -- in Bahrain, Muscat, and Zanzibar -- during the nineteenth century, so as to more accurately map out the interlinked markets for commodities (land, produce, etc.), labor, and capital, the paper instruments that linked them all together, and the circulating discourses that animated them. The discussion of bazaar capitalism in the 19th-century Indian Ocean will serve as the platform for thinking about how we might write a history of capitalism in the Islamic world more broadly.
About the Speaker:
Fahad Ahmad Bishara is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Virginia. He specializes in the economic and legal history of the Indian Ocean and Islamic world. His book, A Sea of Debt: Law and Economic Life in the Western Indian Ocean, 1780-1940 (Cambridge University Press, 2017) is a legal history of economic life in the Western Indian Ocean, told through the story of the Arab and Indian settlement and commercialization of East Africa during the nineteenth century. He is currently working on a series of microhistories of the dhow trade between the Gulf and the Indian Ocean during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. He received his PhD in History from Duke University in 2012 and holds an M.A. in Arab Gulf Studies from the University of Exeter. His research has been supported by the European Research Commission, the Social Science Research Council, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center.

 

Sponsored By:

The IMES Lecture Series is sponsored by the Institute for Middle East Studies and the US Department of Education's Title VI National Resource Center Grant Program.