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March 20, 2019

5:15pm

Lindner Family Commons (Room 602)

1957 E St NW

Washington, DC 20052

The Judge offers a portrait of Judge Kholoud Faqih, one of the first women to
serve as a Palestinian family court judge,. With unparalleled access to the courts,
THE JUDGE presents an unfolding legal drama,offering views into both Islamic
law and gendered justice. In the process, the film illuminates some of the
pressing issues in family law universally and in a Palestinian context.

Mirjam Künkler (Ph.D. Political Science, Columbia University) is Senior Research
Fellow at the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study. Her books include Democracy and Islam in Indonesia, Columbia University Press, 2013; A Secular Age Beyond the West, Cambridge University Press, 2018; Female Religious Authority in Shi‘i Islam: Past and Present (with Devin Stewart), Edinburgh and Oxford University Press, 2019; and The Rule of Law and the Politics of the Judiciary in Contemporary Iran (with Hadi Enayat), Cambridge University Press, 2019. Before joining SCAS, she taught Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University, where she also directed the Oxford-Princeton research cluster on “Traditional authority and transnational religious networks in contemporary Shi’i Islam,” and co-directed the Luce Program on “Religion and International Affairs” for many years. She is a founder and PI of the Iran Data Portal and sits on the boards of various academic journals.

Abdullah Alaoudh is a Senior Fellow at the Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Center for
Christian-Muslim Understanding and a fellow at Yaqeen Islamic Institute. He was
Research Scholar in Law and an Islamic Law & Civilization Research Fellow at Yale
Law School (2017-2018). He earned his LL.M. and S.J.D. from the University of
Pittsburgh School of Law, where his dissertation focused on the role of religious
institutions in post-revolutionary Arab countries and the transition to democracy.
Alaoudh also received his bachelor’s degree in Islamic law from Qassim University.

January 23rd, 2019

6:00pm

Lindner Family Commons (Room 602)

1957 E St NW

Washington, DC 20052

Satoshi Ikeuchi is a professor of Religion and Global Security at the Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology (RCAST) of the University of Tokyo. He was a visiting scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 2009 and Visiting Fellow at the Clare Hall University of Cambridge in 2010. He specializes in Middle East Politics and Arab-Islamic Thought. His publications include Islamukoku-no Shogeki (The Shock of the Islamic State) published in 2015 which was a nation-wide best selling book in Japan and awarded several prizes. He also published literary and critical essays in various journals and compiled them into a book Shomotsu-no Ummei (The Fate of Books) which was award Mainichi Book Review Prize in 2006.

Jon Alterman is a senior vice president, holds the Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy, and is director of the Middle East Program at CSIS. Prior to joining CSIS in 2002, he served as a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and as a special assistant to the assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs. He also previously served as an expert adviser to the Iraq Study Group (also known as the Baker-Hamilton Commission). In addition to his policy work, he often teaches Middle Eastern studies at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and the George Washington University.

Karen Young is a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where she focuses on the political economy of the Middle East, the Cooperation Council for the Arab States of the Gulf (best known as the GCC), and the Arabian Peninsula. She concurrently teaches courses on the international relations and economy of the Middle East at George Washington University and at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

November 8, 2018

6:00pm

Lindner Family Commons (Room 602)

1957 E St NW

Washington, DC 20052

In 2011, Egyptians of all sects, ages, and social classes shook off millennia of autocracy, then elected a Muslim Brother as president. The 2013 military coup replaced him with a new strongman, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, who has cracked down on any dissent or opposition with a degree of ferocity Mubarak never dared. New York Times correspondent David D. Kirkpatrick arrived in Egypt with his family less than six months before the uprising first broke out in 2011, looking for a change from life in Washington, D.C. As revolution and violence engulfed the country, he received an unexpected and immersive education in the Arab world.

For centuries, Egypt has set in motion every major trend in politics and culture across the Middle East, from independence and Arab nationalism to Islamic modernism, political Islam, and the jihadist thought that led to Al Qaeda and ISIS. The Arab Spring revolts of 2011 spread from Cairo, and now Americans understandably look with cynical exasperation at the disastrous Egyptian experiment with democracy. They fail to understand the dynamic of the uprising, the hidden story of its failure, and Washington’s part in that tragedy. In this candid narrative, Kirkpatrick lives through Cairo’s hopeful days and crushing disappointments alongside the diverse population of his new city: the liberal yuppies who first gathered in Tahrir Square; the persecuted Coptic Christians standing guard around Muslims at prayer during the protests; and the women of a grassroots feminism movement that tried to seize its moment. Juxtaposing his on-the-ground experience in Cairo with new reporting on the conflicts within the Obama administration, Kirkpatrick traces how authoritarianism was allowed to reclaim Egypt after thirty months of turmoil.

David D. Kirkpatrick is an international correspondent based in the London bureau of the New York Times. From the beginning of 2011 through the end of 2015 he was the Cairo bureau chief. Before joining The Times in 2000, Mr. Kirkpatrick served as a fact checker for The New Yorker, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal and a contributing editor for New York magazine.\

Ambassador Anne Patterson is the former Assistant Secretary of State for Near
Eastern Affairs (2013-2017) and Ambassador to Egypt (2011-2013), Pakistan (2007-2010), Colombia (2000-2003), and El Salvador (1997-2000). She recently retired with the rank of Career Ambassador after more than four decades in the Foreign Service. Ambassador. Patterson also served as Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, as well as Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations, among other important assignments.

Dr. Yasser El-Shimy will be serving as the moderator of this conversation. Dr. El-
shimey is the co-director of the Program on Civil-Military Relations in Arab States
(CMRAS) at the Carnegie Middle East Center. His expertise covers research design, civil military relations (CMR), democratization, revolutions, domestic politics and international relations in the Middle East. He has worked at the European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) and the International Crisis Group (ICG). He earned his PhD from Boston University in international relations and comparative politics. El-
Shimy has recently published on the conscription system in Tunisia and on Egypt’s foreign policy. El-Shimy is currently an adjunct professor at the Elliott School of International Affairs at the George Washington University.

October 24th, 2018

6:00pm

Lindner Family Commons (Room 602)

1957 E St NW

Washington, DC 20052

Please join us for a conversation about the prospects for Arab reform.

Dr. Marwan Muasher has served as Jordan’s ambassador to the United States, foreign minister, and deputy prime minister; and a member of the Jordanian Senate. He served as senior vice president at the World Bank from 2007-2010. Since 2010 he now currently serves as vice president for studies at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He is overseeing the “Arab Horizons” project on reform in the Arab world at the Carnegie Endowment; copies of the report will be available at the event.

Moderating the conversation will be Dr. Hala al-Dosari, a specialist in health care, as well as a very prominent writer on Saudi social and political affairs. She currently serves as a resident scholar at the center for human rights and global justice at the New York University School of Law, researching the sexual reproductive health of women in Saudi Arabia.